Double Degree Course

Double Degree Course. Degree In Criminology.

Double Degree Course

double degree course

    double degree

  • (Double degrees) Also two courses studied at the same time however they cannot be studied as independent courses eg Medicine/Surgery.
  • A double degree is an undergraduate or postgraduate coursework academic program leading to the award of two University of Adelaide degrees.
  • A double degree program, sometimes called a combined degree, conjoint degree, dual degree, or simultaneous degree program, involves a student working for two different university degrees in parallel, either at the same institution or at different institutions (sometimes in different countries),

double degree course – Champion Cutting

Champion Cutting Tool SJ5 TiN Coated Double Cut Bur, 60 Degree Cone Shape Solid Carbide, 1/2-Inch Cutter Diameter 7/16-Inch Length of Cut
Champion Cutting Tool SJ5 TiN Coated Double Cut Bur, 60 Degree Cone Shape Solid Carbide, 1/2-Inch Cutter Diameter 7/16-Inch Length of Cut
Champion solid carbide Burs with Titanium Nitride coating are manufactured in the USA from C2 tungsten carbide. Completely machined ground for consistently high performance, Champion Burs feature double cut flutes. ‘Double cut’ flutes reduce chips to small, easily disposed particles, while providing better user control for more accurate deburring.60 Degree Cone ShapeMachining of acute angle areas and countersinking1/4-Inch ShankUsed in mold and pattern making, die sinking, tool making and maintenance, burs reach into small intricate areasBurring Cast Iron, steels, titanium, brass, bronze, copper

"Quick, everybody, lean to right!"

"Quick, everybody, lean to right!"
Not a sight you get to see that often: A Routemaster London bus at speed (well, speed for a Routemaster anyway) on a banked racing circuit! It certainly makes a change from the Victoria to Seven Sisters No 73 service that was this 1966 bus’ more usual itinerary a few years previously, when it was still in commercial service in the British capital.

The bus is an AEC Routemaster, registration JJD 504D, LT reporting number RML 2504, built in May of 1966 and in operation until September 2004, while the venue – as any British historic motorsport enthusiast worth his or her salt will already have recognised – is the Brooklands Circuit near Weybridge, Surrey. Now a museum (and a very good one at that), the reason for this rather dramatic use of a big red slice of London public transport history was to publicise Brooklands’ half term holiday tours of the 30 acre site. Inviting journalists to come down and learn how to drive one of these was certainly a good way of generating media exposure. Actually, they’re remarkably easy. The driving position is that of an original Mini, while their size makes them feel like a Volvo 240 that’s been at the junk food a little too much…

This activity isn’t actually as unusual a precedent as it may seem. During Brooklands’ golden era in the 1920s and 30s, double decker London buses were tested on the circuit before going into service, and were also often parked around the track for use by race officials.

Apparently, Routemasters are deemed safe from tipping over up to an angle of 48 degrees. We managed to get to a tilt of 33 degrees. "But it’s okay so long as you keep going," owner Alf Kendry assured me. "What happens if you stop or go too slowly?" I questioned. "Oh, it would probably fall over!" Okay, so absolutely no pressure there then…

The closest thing I can compare this experience to is like being inside a huge domino on wheels just as somebody is about to push it over. Immensely entertaining though…once you’ve got over the sheer terror of a London bus doing this, of course.

Red Routemaster buses are a British icon, immensely popular with both tourists and natives alike. Their withdrawal from London (except for two ‘heritage’ routes), against the wishes of the majority, was mourned by many. In his first election campaign to become Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone stated that he would not be withdrawing the type from service, saying: "Only some ghastly dehumanised moron would want to get rid of the Routemaster." However, in 2004, following his re-election, he promptly announced their phasing out. Many were replaced by so-called ‘bendy buses’, articulated vehicles with about as much character as a Routemaster has in a single wheelnut, and far more congestion-causing and dangerous. Especially if you’re a cyclist…

Still, at least Ken got the bit about the dehumanised moron spot on! He was even closer with ghastly…

Taken at Brooklands Museum, Weybridge, Surrey, England on January 24, 2008.

Nomenclature

Nomenclature
One preposterous consequence …among many… of the infamous 1974 reform of local government was the creation of "Thamesdown", the new local authority for Swindon. Was the town to be renamed then? Apparently it was still Swindon. So why not call the local authority "Swindon Borough Council" or whatever? …the form "Swindon Corporation", of course, being no longer admissable. No one could ever tell you.
In fact the reason was to be discovered in the morbid psychology of the type of person who is drawn to a career in politics. Such a character sees change as his raison d’etre and to influence events is his greatest joy. How gratifying for such a psychological freak to see the signs being changed, the headed notepaper being reprinted; to watch people change their habits and the ways they think about their familiar surroundings …all because he says they should. The opportunity to exert power and influence naturally attracts the kind of person who finds such a prospect attractive. Ordinary folk who simply want to get on with their lives in their own way and leave others to do the same do not seek election to public office. You always get the wrong people in control.
In England at any rate it was not always so …not entirely anyway. In theory, and to some degree in practice, governance was considered a form of service …a vocation. The highest standards were expected and no one got in at the highest level without a Classical education. Such people would have understood, firstly, that placenames cannot be invented …they develop naturally in the speech of the ordinary citizen over centuries, if not millennia. Secondly, that to impose a new name on an existing place is an act of hubris, a metaphysical affront to the genius loci. Furthermore they would have known that words have inalienable meanings and that "Thamesdown", which means "river-hill" is ridiculous and impossible as an English placename. Middle-aged people have always complained about declining standards of course. It’s just that this time around they are right.
By Saturday 27th November 1976 the bus in the photograph, new in 1961 to Swindon Corporation, had acquired the silly Thamesdown "logo", probably concocted at public expense by a firm of design consultants. The vehicle was a Daimler CVG6 with Roe bodywork. The driver appears to be drinking a cup of coffee, no doubt from the vending machine in the canteen shared with the Bristol Omnibus Co. in the building behind the telephone kiosks.
double degree course

double degree course

Parker Brass Pipe Fitting, 90 Degree Street Elbow, 1/8" NPT Male X 1/8" NPT Female
The Parker brass 90-degree street elbow is a pipe fitting with male and female National Pipe Taper (NPT) threads for connecting pipes and fittings. The 90-degree angle can be used to change the direction of flow and, because it is a street elbow, it can connect pipes with male and female thread. It has NPT threading for creating a tighter seal than straight thread and is made from brass, which is more economical and offers greater corrosion resistance than steel.
Pipe fittings are components used for connecting, terminating, controlling flow, and changing the direction of piping in many different industries. When purchasing pipe fittings, consider the application, as this will affect material type, shape, size and required durability. Fittings are available threaded or unthreaded, in many shapes, styles, sizes, and schedules (pipe wall thickness).
Parker Hannifin is a global manufacturer of motion and control technologies. Founded in 1918 as the Parker Appliance Company in Cleveland, OH, Parker Hannifin now provides precision-engineered products for many industries including aerospace, commercial, medical, mobile, and industrial manufacturing. With locations on every continent, and in 48 countries, Parker Hannifin offers a variety of solutions for flow control, filtration, and hydraulics, among many others.

Advertisements